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Roland HandSonic HPD-20...had anyone ever taken one of these apart?

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  • Roland HandSonic HPD-20...had anyone ever taken one of these apart?

    I'd just like to see how the triggers are set up. I'm interested in small pads for hand playing. Thanks

  • #2
    "taken one of these apart?"

    I've replaced the pads on my HPD15. They're FSRs like my TrapKat.
    Last edited by electrodrummer; 03-13-19, 05:15 AM.
    *** Never buy a module without MIDI IN ***
    Yamaha & Roland modules. DTX,TM-2, EC-10m, SP-404. Multi12. TrapKat. ControlPad. Wavedrum. Handsonic. Dynacord RhythmStick. MPC. Paiste 2002/Signatures. Cajons. Djembes. Darbuka. Windsynth. MIDI Bass. Tenori-on. Zoom ARQ. Loads o' synth modules. & some ukes

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    • #3
      Originally posted by electrodrummer View Post
      "taken one of these apart?"

      I've replaced the pads on my HPD15. They're FSRs like my TrapKat.
      Great to know. My electronics level is extra basic but I'm very interested in getting more expression in a diy played with fingers. I didn't know what an FSR was but looked it up. It would seem like fsr's would be way better than piezos? I wonder how you figured out how to do that? Thanks

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      • #4
        Go to https://www.alternatemode.com/ All their products are FSR based. They also have kits.
        *** Never buy a module without MIDI IN ***
        Yamaha & Roland modules. DTX,TM-2, EC-10m, SP-404. Multi12. TrapKat. ControlPad. Wavedrum. Handsonic. Dynacord RhythmStick. MPC. Paiste 2002/Signatures. Cajons. Djembes. Darbuka. Windsynth. MIDI Bass. Tenori-on. Zoom ARQ. Loads o' synth modules. & some ukes

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by electrodrummer View Post
          Go to https://www.alternatemode.com/ All their products are FSR based. They also have kits.
          I hadn't heard of them. Looking forward to checking it out. Thanks

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          • #6
            This reminds me the following video I saw on YT time ago, but this project was to play with drumsticks and it's piezo based, not FSR.
            I wonder if it could be possible with piezo doing something like you need avoiding crosstalk for a cheaper solution (IDK there, here a FSR is about more than 10 times expensive than a piezo).

            Roland TD-12 module, MegaDrum Trigger module, DIY DareStone CLDRUMWH A2E drum conversion, DIY rack using Dixon clamps, Pearl P-932 double pedal, DIY A2E Chang dual zone cymbals.

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            • #7
              Piezos are best for slew-rate detection, to see if there's an impulse at all and - partly - how it looks like. It's not the best choice for detecting pressure changes over time, and often attempts at such tend to break the device. It's a relatively fragile piece of crystal. But it spits out voltage directly, which helps in keeping surrounding circuits simple. Piezos are cheap to manufacture, and parts tolerance is under fairly good control.

              FSRs are pretty much the opposite. They are excellent for measuring pressure. They can withstand high forces (in comparison to piezos), so they're excellent for sensoring hand play and gestures. Surrounding circuits need to take into account that they're just a variable resistor, so - for instance - for an ADC you need a voltage source. The advantage is that the external voltage decides over the maximum voltage going to the ADC, whereas a piezo needs clamping diodes (e.g. Schottky diode) or a voltage divider to 'suck' voltage by being a current drain (a small piezo can easily create 50-100V, although the current is very small).
              FSRs typically have high manufacturing tolerances, often the resistance is 10-20% off. This needs to be taken into account when trying to measure absolute forces, and most circuits or software behind an ADC have calibration routines. But even then measurement suffers long-term stability; the output resistance drifts with applied pressure. 'Good' FSRs therefore can be harder to find, are more expensive (10-50x the price of a piezo), and are often custom-made by manufacturers to make the resistor range and mechanical area suit the actual needs. It can break or deliver wrong and unsteady results with uneven pressure across the surface, so good care has to be taken for the mechanical aspects. FSRs can be very fast but any dampening material (such as foam) acts as a lowpass for fast detection, and also makes detection nonlinear (exponential towards low frequencies/long-term pressure).
              Last edited by sascha; 03-25-19, 03:02 AM.
              gear: MarkDrum YES e-kit highly modified (low-volume trigger cymbals, 16" DIY kick, 12" DIY snare + tom 3, Goedrum HH controller), Triggera 10" splash
              band: http://theboardmusic.com

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