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Developing Trigger -> MIDI Hardware -- Looking for marketing suggestions

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  • #16
    Hmm..

    The programming of the MegaDRUM could be challenging but not impossible. Here is an old video clip with me playing with a MegaDRUM, AD2 on a MacBook. (I think it is triggering great)

    https://youtu.be/6zPP11_ATnA

    Anders Gronlund / www.zourman.com
    Pearl CrystalBeat and Sonor Safari, Roland CY-14/13R/15R/12CR, RT-10x,2xBT-1,VH-11/12/13 & KD-10, Quartz, Pintech Dingbat, Triggera D14,D11, ATV AD-h14, 120MHz MegaDRUM with PS board, 2box 5&3, dd4SE, TD-9, Addictive Drums 2.1.8. All ADpaks, Microsoft Surface PRO, Macbook, Pearl Throne Thumper, Zourman HH & Ride Conv Kit www.zourman.com

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    • #17
      Originally posted by angr77 View Post
      The programming of the MegaDRUM could be challenging but not impossible.
      I think he have his own product in mind instead programming on an existent one, he said he wants something small and simple, though I agree that having an all in one product instead a trigger expansion apart as expansion for an existent module could be a better solution, but at that point MegaDrum is already there.
      ...otherwise contact me if anyone wants to create a simplified (and opensource) MegaDrum software

      yeahtuna : what programming language are you using for the UI? I use Qt and C++ currently.
      Last edited by redtide; 10-25-18, 10:44 PM.
      Roland TD-12 module, DIY DareStone CLDRUMWH A2E drum conversion, DIY rack using Dixon clamps, Pearl P-932 double pedal.

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      • #18
        I'm programming in C++ in the hardware and software. I'm leaning to start with something small and simple to produce. It that's sustainable, perhaps something will more inputs.

        If I go with something small, I want it to be as compact as possible. How do people feel about a 3.5mm TRS MIDI jacks?

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        • #19
          I know the 3.5mm jacks are small and compact, but I prefer the 6.3mm also because I have a lot of them

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          • #20
            Originally posted by yeahtuna View Post
            If I go with something small, I want it to be as compact as possible. How do people feel about a 3.5mm TRS MIDI jacks?
            Not much reliable/robust for a musical instrument. I wanted to use them for my cymbals but in the end I agree with some people that told me that after some time you will get contact problems and the like. I use them only for my little "e-splashes".
            Roland TD-12 module, DIY DareStone CLDRUMWH A2E drum conversion, DIY rack using Dixon clamps, Pearl P-932 double pedal.

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            • #21
              I've started to use mini-xlr connectors with my own stuff. Small-sized and reliable. For small signals even 1/4" TRS can be problematic contact-wise.
              MarkDrum YES e-kit highly modified (DIY hall-sensor based hihat, low-volume trigger cymbals, 16" DIY kick, 12" DIY snare + tom 3), Triggera 10" splash
              Gibraltar 9607NL-DP Legless Hi Hat, Intruder Double Pedal
              Shure SE215 in-ears w. CustomArt silicone tips

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              • #22
                I just happened onto this thread and I have a few ideas. First, my background....I used to be the VP for the Americas for Steinberg Media Technology.....so i happen to know a little bit about selling/marketing hardware/software in this space. First, given the movement for e-drums to move to software based platforms for sounds, I feel there is absolutely a market for a reliable, easy to program trigger to MIDI interfaces.....at the right price. I know that the Ddrums DDTI and Alesis IO are out there but apparently they have spotty reputation for being reliable and easy to program. So here are my product thoughts:

                Entry level product priced between US$125 and US$195.

                Compatible with a wide range of drum triggers, especially the plethora of Piezo based clip-on and "built in" mechanisms available (Ddrum, Drum-Tec, Jobeky, Convertible Percussion, etc.). There seems to be a wide range of DIY drum triggers out there. Testing with a couple of these would be wise as well. See: http://www.v-drumtips.com/projects/flextrigger-system/

                Expandable architecture. Let entry level drummers buy a base unit, then buy an expansion unit as they increase the size of their kits. Have the units "gangable" for additional trigger inputs. In this manner, you can address multiple market segments with just 1 product.

                No snake cables. TRS 6.35mm trigger inputs. Follow the industry standard

                No specialty MIDI connectors. Use robust 5-pin DIN sockets AND provide for USB. In certain instances latency via USB can be WORSE than 5-pin DIN, depending on the architecture of the host computer.

                Fast trigger sensing. Given today's electronics, the majority of the latency should be via the computer/software....not the trigger interface.

                Simple, graphical programming/setup interface via computer. Connect via network or USB. I would prefer a IP based HTML "editor" but I'm not sure what that would add to the product cost. Better yet...a BlueTooth connection that would allow computers, tablets, or smartphones to make trigger adjustments.

                "Happy Lights" on the face of the unit for visual indication that trigger signals are being received and MIDI is being sent. No need for a elaborate front panel LCD panel or a lot of buttons. A graphical representation of how strong the incoming trigger"hit" is via a thermometer bar in a HTML GUI would be best.

                Presets to store trigger parameters either as individual drums or as complete kits.

                Downloadable "presets" profiles for the popular drums and cymbals.

                USB bus power or wall wart as an option. You will need the wall wart for people choosing to hook it up via 5 pin MIDI.

                Hi Hat controller input.

                TRS cymbal inputs that can be ganged to service 3-zone/choke cymbals which require 2 jacks.

                TRS drum inputs for dual zone drums.

                I would buy such a unit tonight if I could find one with a good market acceptance and solid reputation for triggering reliably for under $200.

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