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Do I need edges if I buy a shell?

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  • Do I need edges if I buy a shell?

    Topic basically says it all. IF I want to go the full, 100% diy route to build a snare. I've found some drum shell 'sellers'. Most of them come with bearing edges... which I understand and know that for an acoustic set - absolutely necessary. I began to wonder ... for mesh head trigger application ... is an edge needed? I guess you probably need something or the mesh head would get torn/cut at the sharp edge of the shell?? Basically what got me wondering is that some of these vendors offer shells with edges included and other have an option that adds to the cost for edges. I'd never really considered it previously.

    I'm not wanting traditional sized (as far as depth goes) for the pads... more like the newer Roland drums or the Alesis size, guess about 4.5 to 5 inches max .... so my other option is finding some old drums on craigs list and then basically cutting them to the depth that I want.... but my biggest concern there is that there is enough hardware to attach the head/hoop.

    Anyway, back to the original question - I'm guessing the answer is yes, but wanted to ask to be sure - do the mesh heads require bearing edges in the shell?

    Thanks!

  • #2
    As a general rule I would suggest that the shell include some kind of bearing edge. The bearing edge in a e-drum isn't there necessarily there for the same reason as on your typical A-drum (which helps with attack and resonance). Primarily, I wouldn't want the two 90 shell angles to present some unknown mechanical force on the mesh head... it may lead to eroding the material on those angles and premature wear on the head.

    The Roland shells come with a bearing edge as does the basket holding the electronics (where the head actually makes contact. See the attached images.

    Roland Shell 1.JPG

    Roland Shell 2.JPG
    Hardware: TD20SX --> Roland UA-25EX --> MSI GT780DX w/ i7 2670, 16-GB of Ram, Windows 7
    Software: Superior Drummer 2.0, Metal Foundry SDX, Metal Machine EZX, Toontrack Solo - - Sonor X1 Studio - -

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    • #3
      I bought raw shells for my DYI, same thing 5" deep. I went with the cheapest and thinnest shell I could find as tone does not matter. mine don't have edges and years later I'm still on the original cheap mesh heads. But if the cost is close, better safe then sorry I guess. I will say I'm not easy on my kit. I hit hard and do lots of outdoor gigs and leave them on the rack in transit. They have held up very well.

      Seems like way too much work to saw drums in half when you can buy the raw shells pretty cheap. I think I put about 85 bucks a piece into mu completed drum. That's shell, hardware, triggers, head and stain. $40 per shell, 8 per trigger/cone, bought additional triggers for .38 cents a piece bulk and stuck them to the side of the shell with double sided tape. The rest was hardware, heads and stain. I still get compliments on the kit. So I see no need to spend a ton. I do have the new Roland digi snare now and that is a very worthwhile expense, imo. The other pads just don't need the dynamics of the snare though, imo. I've changed the kick heads to white since this old lousy pic, but you get the idea..
      TD50 Digital Pack, TD30 and TD9 Modules, custom made pads, Gen16 crashes, and hats plus a few other things that I'm not sure what to do with or why they're still in my kit. Bands: Espada http://www.musicaespada.com/ and JamCo https://www.facebook.com/JamcoEntertainment, https://www.jamcoband.com/

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      • #4
        Originally posted by BWaj View Post
        I bought raw shells for my DYI, same thing 5" deep. I went with the cheapest and thinnest shell I could find as tone does not matter. mine don't have edges and years later I'm still on the original cheap mesh heads. But if the cost is close, better safe then sorry I guess. I will say I'm not easy on my kit. I hit hard and do lots of outdoor gigs and leave them on the rack in transit. They have held up very well.

        Seems like way too much work to saw drums in half when you can buy the raw shells pretty cheap. I think I put about 85 bucks a piece into mu completed drum. That's shell, hardware, triggers, head and stain. $40 per shell, 8 per trigger/cone, bought additional triggers for .38 cents a piece bulk and stuck them to the side of the shell with double sided tape. The rest was hardware, heads and stain. I still get compliments on the kit. So I see no need to spend a ton. I do have the new Roland digi snare now and that is a very worthwhile expense, imo. The other pads just don't need the dynamics of the snare though, imo. I've changed the kick heads to white since this old lousy pic, but you get the idea..
        You have exactly what I'm looking to do - from a rack tom perspective. Do you remember where you bought the shells/hardware?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by alancole View Post

          You have exactly what I'm looking to do - from a rack tom perspective. Do you remember where you bought the shells/hardware?
          Hardware was from https://www.drumfactorydirect.com/

          Shells from http://www.drummaker.com/
          TD50 Digital Pack, TD30 and TD9 Modules, custom made pads, Gen16 crashes, and hats plus a few other things that I'm not sure what to do with or why they're still in my kit. Bands: Espada http://www.musicaespada.com/ and JamCo https://www.facebook.com/JamcoEntertainment, https://www.jamcoband.com/

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          • #6
            If you are creating a diy then you just need to take a sander and make them round and smooth. I have made every type of E Drum including fitting Roland baskets in custom shells. You should sand them down to 600 grit and make them as smooth and round as possible. Its best for the mesh head. Good Luck
            www.EDrumForum.com Going to be strictly a DIY e Drum Community

            http://www.vdrums.com/forum/album.php?albumid=198

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            • #7
              I agree, just sand them. I don't think you have to go crazy. I think 200 grit would be OK, but if you have finer grit on hand, it only takes a minute to go up with each coarse level, and I'd do it.
              ATV aDrums & aD5, Pearl Mimic Pro & DIY, Agean R-series Silent Cymbals, Roland Handsonic HPD-20.

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