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Trigger foam from makeup sponge

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  • #16
    Originally posted by mkok View Post
    My only worry looking at the pictures is that you are not covering all the piezo. I would think you need to transfer the energy to the full size. I donít know the technicalities so could be totally wrong. When I built mine I covered the piezo completely.
    No need at all. In fact, with a smaller piece of foam on top and supporting the outer edges underneath you can get much higher sensitivity. The larger the foam, the more energy it absorbs and does not pass down to the piezo. Centre cones need to be able to absorb a significant amount of energy because they have to take direct hits and prevent damage to the piezo, but a side-mounted trigger doesn't have this problem, provided you don't hit it directly. Also, the head will flex more and transfer more energy in the centre, which is why side-mounted triggers need to be more sensitive to get the same performance.
    trigger.jpg
    The foam used here is poron, but any foam that quickly returns to its shape will work.
    MegaDrum module, DIY A2E pads, DIY hall effect 3 zone hi hat, DIY 1, 2 & 3 zone cymbals, DIY kick beater triggers on DIY modded longboard, direct drive pedals, DIY triple driver IEMs, El Cheapo Buttkicker. Various VSTs running in a tweaked Linux Mint. Kit pics thread

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    • #17
      Ignotus.
      Thatís exactly what Iím finding out.
      Years ago I designed and built a two trigger pad. It worked really well. But a real drum is a whole different beast. Ií've recently become interested in drums again. Ií've gained a lot of knowledge from your posts over the years. Thanks for that.
      Lots of other things I want to try with this drum. It should be fun.

      Digitalstring
      Last edited by digitalstring; 05-16-18, 07:06 PM.

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      • #18
        Like I said in my previous post. Sensitivity is directly related to how much the piezo bends. If you support only the outside of the piezo, and your cone, or what ever you have on top only contacts in the center, you will bend the piezo more then when the cone covers the entire piezo --> more sensitivity. Like Ignotus says, the function of the cone is both in transferring the impact, but also in absorbing the energy. Obviously hitting the piezo directly will give you the best sensitivity, but the piezo won't survive that. I think that part of the reason that center-mounted triggers are cone shaped is partly tho be able to absorb more energy in the same volume.
        Brain: mega drum. 5 toms: DIY mesh head, side-mounted DIY triggers. Snare: 14" 682 head, DIY crossbar trigger. 2xDIY beaterless BD pedal. .Cymbals: Crash: 2x 16" brass: 2 zone. Ride: 20" brass: 2 zone. Hi-Hat: 14" 1 zone DIY Control pedal + Pearl H900 stand. + drum rack:

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        • #19
          Thanks guys some interesting points made
          Roland TD30 module on TD20 kit SD3 with various kits. Pearl Masters Kit, Yamaha 9000RC original natural wood finish. Cymbals from Zildgian Pasite and Sabian. Loads of percussion bits. Cubase and Wavelab always current versions.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by allanjohn View Post
            The sensor cone is a crucial determinant of trigger performance and I believe itís worth spending a few dollars to get ďthe right thingĒ. In my opinion, itís not worth jeopardising your performance when ready-made, reliable and dependable options are available.
            nice sharing!

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