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Step-by-step guide for A2E conversion. Kick drum

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  • Step-by-step guide for A2E conversion. Kick drum

    Hello all, second part of my A2E conversion, kick drum. See Snare and Tom conversion using pan cake method in the separate post.
    In this post I’m sharing my experience converting 22 x 18 Tama Swingstar kick drum.

    Design sketch
    01.png

    Design description
    • 8 x L-brackets (2”) are attached to the drum shell using existing lug screws
    • Round plywood platform is resting on the 2” L-brackets
    • Metal framing bracket is attached to the plywood platform. It could be moved closer to the drum rim to adjust trigger position
    • Furniture leveling foot is attached to the L-Bracket and acts as a trigger platform. It is used to adjust trigger height.
    • 22” Mesh head is used on the beater side. Stock logo head is used on the resonant side, no vents in it.
    • Foam cushion is installed in the middle of the drum, under the beaters to reduce undesired “bounce”. Roland uses memory foam in KD-120. I did not have memory foam and did not want to buy and cannibalize memory foam mattresses/pillows. Multiple layers of foam from thick exercise mat have done the job

    Shopping list
    • Furniture leveling feet (1)
    • Framing L-bracket
    • 8 x smaller 2” L-brackets
    • ½ x 24” x 24“plywood
    • Screws (10-32x2”)
    • Washers (3/16)
    • Lock nuts (10-32)
    • 3M Super 77 spray adhesive
    • Tape
    Source: Home Depot
    Lock nuts (with elastic stops) are essential for this build to stop nut from loosening.
    • Soundproofing egg-crate foam.
    Source: Amazon
    • Piezo triggers
    • Foam cone
    • Double-sided foam tape
    • ¼ Stereo connector
    • Plastic cable bracket
    Source: Quartz Percussions.
    Quartz sells all pieces as a dual trigger package. I have placed special order for 27 mm triggers.
    • 22” Mesh head
    Source: Billy Blast
    • Double Bass Drum Patch.
    Source: Long & McQuade Music Store.
    I have used Evans EQ, mainly because it was in stock. Essential when using felt beaters – direct contact with felt beater would damage mesh head.


    Build

    Step 1. Measure inside diameter of the cut circle out of plywood. I have cut the circle about 1” smaller than drum’s internal diameter, allowing plenty of space for support brackets. Router and plywood jig used to cut the circle

    02.jpg


    Step 2. Cut 3 holes to reduce platform weight. The side of the platform without the hole will be used to mount the trigger platform on metal bracket.

    03.jpg

    Step 3. Install L-brackets using existing lug screws.

    04.jpg

    Step 4. Attach the platform to the L-brackets. Make sure drum’s vent hole is lined-up with the side of the platform without the hole in it. Stereo connector jack will be installed in this hole, and the trigger will be installed on the same side.

    05.jpg


    Step 5. Bend framing L-bracket, giving it C shape.
    Drill two holes to attach bracket to the plywood platform, another hole for the leveling foot, and a hole for cable management bracket. Make sure the holes in the top of the bracket line-up with the bottom holes, top hole will be used to access heads of the attachment screws.

    06.jpg


    Step 6. Install stereo jack using existing vent hole. I had to remove metal vent hole grommet. So far, this is the single modification to the drum itself.

    Glue the foam circle in the middle of the drum. I have cut multiple circles out of the foam mat (roughly 8” in diameter). Foam pad is thick enough to be even with the drum rim. In my case, exactly five layers of foam provided desired thickness. All layers were glued together using spray adhesive.

    When both stereo jack and foam are installed, locate bracket position. I have not used any science to figure out how far the trigger should be from the rim of the drum – just eyeballed it where it looked good. Center of the trigger cone ended-up 3” from the inside edge of the drum rim.

    07.jpg


    Step 7. Secure the trigger bracket to plywood platform and install furniture leveling foot. Main purpose of the leveling foot is precise trigger height adjustment.
    08.jpg


    Step 8. Install the trigger and trigger cone, attach and secure the cable using plastic bracket. I also have used rubber foam to wrap the trigger cable. Adjust the trigger height, so it is 1.5 – 3 mm above the rim.

    09.jpg


    Step 9. Line-up insides of the drum with acoustic egg-crate foam. I have used spray adhesive to glue the foam to the platform. Foam on the sides of the drum is press-fitted. Nothing is glued to the drum itself. This keeps A2E conversion fully reversible.

    10.jpg
    Step 10. Install mesh head and drum hoop before flipping the drum. NOTE: Trigger cone sits above the drum rim. Installing mesh head and hoops would protect trigger cone from damage when handling the drum.

    Install acoustic foam on the resonant side of the drum. Again, only bottom layer is glued to the plywood platform. Side pieces of the foam are stuck together using tape and pressed against the drum shell. Last piece of the acoustic foam is made into a circle, and it is located directly under resonant head. This would remove any unwanted vibration and buzzing from resonant head.

    11.jpg


    Step 11. Mount the drum and install drum head patch. This is critical for felt-beaters to preserve the drum head. Felt beater would eat away the mesh head in no time.

    12.jpg


    Step 12. Adjust the controller module. For Roland TD-12, trigger type is set to KD140. Sensitivity is set to 21. No other settings were changed. I did not have to adjust re-trigger values.
    13.jpg


    End result

    14.jpg

    Conclusions
    • Kick drum looks and works great
    • No issues with triggering, or double-triggering. Foam cylinder under the beater removes all mesh head vibration
    • Noise level is comparable with Roland KD-120.

    Problems and solutions

    Problem: Mesh head is rubbing against the blue foam inside the drum, right under the beater. This grinds the foam, eating it away, and creating dust inside the drum.
    Solution: Install double-bass patch inside the mesh head. Now instead of the mesh head, slick patch is rubbing against the foam. No more foam grinding.


    Cheers,

    Dmitry



    Attached Files
    Roland TD-12, DIY drums (Tama Swingstar), CY-15R, 2x CY-14C, VH-12, CY-5

  • #2
    Looks amazing, Great Job
    www.EDrumForum.com Going to be strictly a DIY e Drum Community

    http://www.vdrums.com/forum/album.php?albumid=198

    Comment


    • #3
      Nice work, i once started with something just like you, with the plywood, and pieces cut out. i even had the same problem with the mesh eating away at the foam, which I solved with a piece of a mylar head over the foam. In the end I found the noise level of the mesh still too loud. (it was the loudest part of my kit) After some tinkering I have decided to go for a beaterless approach, much like the krigg.

      Brain: mega drum. 5 toms: DIY mesh head, side-mounted DIY triggers. Snare: 14" 682 head, DIY crossbar trigger. 2xDIY beaterless BD pedal. .Cymbals: Crash: 2x 16" brass: 2 zone. Ride: 20" brass: 2 zone. Hi-Hat: 14" 1 zone DIY Control pedal + Pearl H900 stand. + drum rack:

      Comment


      • #4
        nice work ... do you have part number for the "Furniture leveling feet"? thanks.

        Comment


        • #5
          Very Nice works, this way will have better result then Roland kda22 which is loud as well.
          [www.mimicpro.com ][ www.dwdrums.com ] [www.zildjian.com]

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by tivi View Post
            nice work ... do you have part number for the "Furniture leveling feet"? thanks.
            Not sure what the part number was, but here is a picture of the package. Hope it helps.

            15.jpg
            Attached Files
            Roland TD-12, DIY drums (Tama Swingstar), CY-15R, 2x CY-14C, VH-12, CY-5

            Comment


            • #7
              Looks good ,a lot more complicated than mine. All i did was slap a roland mesh head on my 22inc bass drum ,added a remo slam patch ,put 2 pillows inside the bass drum and added a ddrum bass drum trigger and its quiet and works perfectly.
              ATV AD5 module,vh11, cy12c/r, cy15r, cy13c/r, axis long boards double pedal,pearl export drum shells with roland mesh heads,ddrum trigger on floor tom & roland rt30k trigger on kick drum,quartz trigger harness in upper toms and snare

              Comment


              • #8
                just googled and nowhere in US sale these Everbilt Slider Glides thanks.

                Comment


                • #9
                  found this thanks http://www.rockler.com/1-1-2-screw-o...ryoaAho08P8HAQ

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Awesome and thank you for the write up. Did you use a 27mm or 35mm piezo? Or does it really matter?
                    Pearl Mimic PRO
                    DDrum DDTi
                    Custom DIY Conversion

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The size of the piezo has mainly an influence on the sensitivity. I used 35mm piezos for my kit, but I had to cool them all down with a potmeter. the way you mount the piezo, and the foam you use also has an influence on the sensitivity.

                      Basiccaly the piezo gives out a voltage that is related to the amount of "bend" in the disk. more bend, or more disk to bend will give a larger signal.
                      Brain: mega drum. 5 toms: DIY mesh head, side-mounted DIY triggers. Snare: 14" 682 head, DIY crossbar trigger. 2xDIY beaterless BD pedal. .Cymbals: Crash: 2x 16" brass: 2 zone. Ride: 20" brass: 2 zone. Hi-Hat: 14" 1 zone DIY Control pedal + Pearl H900 stand. + drum rack:

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by kromberg View Post
                        Awesome and thank you for the write up. Did you use a 27mm or 35mm piezo? Or does it really matter?
                        I have used 27 mm piezo. I figured it is easier to easy to increase sensitivity in the drum module if needed. For Roland TD-12, I had to increase sensitivity from 12 to 21, so the hardest hit just starting to peak in the trigger setup menu.
                        It would be much harder to decrease sensitivity if piezo is to "hot", which I believe could happen with 35 mm piezo. Potentiometer is needed for fine-tuning, just as Viperr commented.


                        Roland TD-12, DIY drums (Tama Swingstar), CY-15R, 2x CY-14C, VH-12, CY-5

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Beautifully done!
                          TD30 | PD-128S, PD-128, (2) PD-108, PD-120 | KD-120 | (2) CY15R, (2) CY14C, CY13R, CY12C, VH11 | MDS-25 rack | DW3000 double bass pedal | DW3000 HH stand | roc-n-soc nitro throne | Audio Technica ATH-M40x

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Dmitryse View Post

                            I have used 27 mm piezo. I figured it is easier to easy to increase sensitivity in the drum module if needed. For Roland TD-12, I had to increase sensitivity from 12 to 21, so the hardest hit just starting to peak in the trigger setup menu.
                            It would be much harder to decrease sensitivity if piezo is to "hot", which I believe could happen with 35 mm piezo. Potentiometer is needed for fine-tuning, just as Viperr commented.

                            Like I said in my previous post. Sensitivity depends on multiple factors. The piezo size is just one of them. Just try it out, and see what works best for you. By a bunch of 35 mm and 27 mm piezo's and experiment (they aren't that expensive...

                            For the kick the whole sensitivity thing is not really and issue. I don't think you want to be able to do real soft kicks.

                            As for the potmeter:
                            I go for the potmeter approach because I want to make sure I use the maximum dynamical range of my module.
                            Brain: mega drum. 5 toms: DIY mesh head, side-mounted DIY triggers. Snare: 14" 682 head, DIY crossbar trigger. 2xDIY beaterless BD pedal. .Cymbals: Crash: 2x 16" brass: 2 zone. Ride: 20" brass: 2 zone. Hi-Hat: 14" 1 zone DIY Control pedal + Pearl H900 stand. + drum rack:

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Viperr View Post
                              For the kick the whole sensitivity thing is not really and issue. I don't think you want to be able to do real soft kicks.
                              Up until recently, I would have agreed with you but I've started getting into jazz recently with my drum teacher, and playing soft kicks seems to be a must. Also, I recently attended a Stanton Moore clinic and was blown away by how he uses the kick drum as melodic instrument, using different dynamics on it.

                              Having recently upgraded to a TD30, I was very pleased to find out that it attempts to replicate those types of nuances found in an acoustic kick drum that doesn't have too much muffling on it.
                              TD30 | PD-128S, PD-128, (2) PD-108, PD-120 | KD-120 | (2) CY15R, (2) CY14C, CY13R, CY12C, VH11 | MDS-25 rack | DW3000 double bass pedal | DW3000 HH stand | roc-n-soc nitro throne | Audio Technica ATH-M40x

                              Comment

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