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DIY 3 Zone cymbal v2

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  • ignotus
    replied
    I think they're about 2 mm thick. Where do you live? The Stagg cymbals are fairly easy to find in Europe but not elsewhere.

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  • AnjiN
    replied
    Hello, guys!

    I can't find these stagg cymbals... I'll try makin' my own plastic cymbals! So.. can you tell me the thickness of these stagg?

    Many thanks!

    Anjin.

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  • mrtechne
    replied
    I will be trying it out with acoustic cymbals. But ive also seen you can mold pexi glass. Or acrylic to the shape of a cymbal so i might do that route if the acoustics done trigger properly.

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  • ignotus
    replied
    Do you have 20" practice cymbals or are you going to use acoustics?

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  • mrtechne
    replied
    Ive been looking at this thread for a while now and never realized there was a hit next page.... XD so finally after reading every post ever made on this thread i fully under stand how this was made and will be attempting to recreate it as a 20 in ride .-. I have 2 just laying around not being used anymore so why not. Thanks ignotus for having so much patience for us! When i get this done i will be posting a video if it works lol and showing step by step how i went on doing it. Credit twards you of corse

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  • lucascha
    replied

    thank you ignotus

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  • ignotus
    replied
    That looks right. Just to make sure here's your image with an annotation:
    wiring.png

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  • lucascha
    replied

    The junction of the two plates would look like this ?
    Dark orange and one half and light orange the other and gray and a tape to isolate the contact,
    if it is not so, you can post a drawing with two parts on top of each other

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  • ignotus
    replied
    A few posts above are pictures with explanations of where everything goes. I'm sorry but I'm not going to spoon-feed the fundamental basics in this thread (see preface in first post).

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  • lucascha
    replied
    Shows a photo of the piezos connection on the female connector post.

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  • ignotus
    replied
    Is your copper self-adhesive? If it is, maybe the surface wasn't clean before sticking it on. I have several cymbals that use self-adhesive copper tape and that's not happened to a single one of them in 3 years. If it isn't, I can only suggest that you get some, and make sure the surface is properly clean before sticking it on.

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  • Bohdisatva
    replied
    So I have made this design with some modificAtions. Has anyone else run into the problem where the copper stops sticking to the cymbal and then the copper then obviously causes a choke non stop? Iím about to re-copper the edges and add some stronger bonding glue. Any specific glue you used if you ran into this?

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  • pumpal
    replied
    Thanks Ignotus - To be honest since I bought also some 2mm rubber, I thought about doing that (applying rubber on the contact zones), but will leave it for the next one .. I am considering now getting 16" pads to make a ride for my main set... I am not sure how durable that ikea pad will be. But, that 1mm rubber I have can be glued on top of it to make it stronger.. though that makes it more noisy ..
    I'll share one other idea I tried and it worked surprisingly well - for my hh buld, I actually used that Ikea mat instead of the top cymbal .. I put the piezo (one) on the bottom of the cymbal. The piezo is mounted using a half circle the diameter of the piezo) of 2mm rubber - Yamaha alike. The copper tape is stuck to the periphery of the mat and it is spaced around 15mm from the edge with double-sided foam tape. That worked great for a 2 zone cymbal.
    It's ugly as it was a test build, but worked very good too:
    https://goo.gl/photos/fnPGEQbaAd7NNDv58
    https://goo.gl/photos/YgtYG7DZrT4Ff3nk8
    The rubber on the bottom side is to add weight to it and to mute it.
    Last edited by pumpal; 02-21-17, 11:52 AM.

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  • ignotus
    replied
    Congrats Pumpal, glad you finally found a solution for the noise and were able to finish it off. I actually have a couple of those Ikea mats lying around but it didn't occur to me to use them... The vinyl layer on mine is starting to crack in places - it's only noticeable when looking closely but I'll probably have to "re-skin" them sometime in the future.

    A slight improvement to the last cymbal I made was to stick on a very thin strip (about 2 mm wide) of 1 mm thick rubber around the edge and the bell, and I then applied the copper over that and increased the thickness of the separating rubber accordingly. It reduces the noise made when the two cymbals come together when hit. To improve the bell triggering, you could add a circle of cardboard or something and reapply the copper over that to reduce the gap.

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  • pumpal
    replied
    Originally posted by romolox View Post
    Hi pumpal,same question did you get it working or not?
    thanks all
    Hi guys,
    I admit I abandoned the project for a while because I ran out of copper tape (initially I purchased only 4m which turned out to be not enough for a first time build when you don't yet know what you are doing ) but you kept this thread alive, so I decided I will finish it.
    Here is a link with pictures illustrating what it ended up as.

    What is different then the original design of Ignotus is that I used another, more simple and thus easy method of covering the top. I found a place mat in Ikea - Ikea item number 701.324.55 - which is really cheap and is like 1cm bigger in diameter then 14" . I then used a shoe glue alike adhesive to glue it to the top cymbal. The glue I used was not exactly a shoe glue, but more a glue that was for gluing rubber/cloth/plastic intended for the furniture industry. I used a paint brush to cover both the mat and the cymbal, waited for 5min and stacked another cymbal on top to keep the two parts in place. I used a hi-hat clutch to keep the sandwich depressed and waited for it to cure for 48h. After that I cut the excessive mat around the periphery with scissors. You can see the result, to me it is ideal. The material the mat is made of is a mouse pad alike stiff foam, but not as thick and with plastic-rubberized top surface- adds some softness and makes the cymbal quiet, little bit more loud then a rubber Roland or Yamaha. The rebound is Ok too - slightly less then the rebound of a rubber Roland or Yamaha.

    The material I used for the separation between the two pieces was some 1mm thick floor isolation rubber I bought from a construction store. It was cheaper then the PVC and very easy to work with - cut an glue - but it has some bad smell to it - like cheap car mats - I hope that will go away soon though.

    Another difference then the original design is that I didn't use a project box to host a female jack, as IMO it introduces a lot of dis-balance (adds weight to one of the sides) .
    Instead I just hot-glued a cable.

    This cymbal I intend to use with the spare parts/leftovers set I am putting together to use with my Versa trigger wireless boxes, so I also connected the 10k resistor to the bell zone, so I can use the cymbal as is with my Roland module if I decide. It doesn't matter for the Versa u-box which zone will have the resistor- you can set the resulting midi note as you want.


    I admit the electrical interconnection does not look as pretty as it could with more planning prior taping
    I also probably made some other small mistakes - the piezos ie are too high - too much towards the bell - I should've placed them bit more towards the edge.
    The triggering is almost even across the top of the cymbal with slight raise of the amplitude around where the piezos are, but not as a hot spot. I think It is completely playable.
    The edge triggers reliably and perfectly, though it is is a contact of two hard surfaces and so creates an audible slapping sound. Choking works easy and great too.
    The bell zone is not that easy to trigger, I need to hit harder there, so that is another thing I could've done better - I should have make the cuts on the bell area little bit longer. But for a first attempt it turned out pretty good I think and I will be proudly using it .

    Thanks Ignotus for sharing his ingenious design and supporting it by answering everyones questions!

    Last edited by pumpal; 02-21-17, 08:53 AM.

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