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DIY 3-zone cymbal (revisited)

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  • #16
    Again, well done.

    How many sections did you cut for the bell and for the rim?
    I ordered some cymbals too and will cut them with my CNC Mill...

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    • #17
      Thanks.
      I cut 12 segments in the bell (first cymbal had 10) and I think something like 36 around the edge (first one had 32, but it was also a bigger cymbal). Wow, CNC. I used a hacksaw around the edge, pretty easy and fast to do, but had to use a loose hacksaw blade for the bell cuts for obvious reasons.

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      • #18
        May I ask question? Do this method also works for Yamaha module (3zone) which used piezo/switch method?

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        • #19
          I'm not sure, I think it uses a more complex circuitry than just a 10k resistor to separate the edge and bell switches. I can't do it now, but I'll look it up later.

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          • #20
            I just found a schematic for Yamaha cymbals and they also use a 10k resistor to separate the bell and edge switches, so the above design should work as-is with Yamaha modules. The extra components in their design are for adjusting the piezo signal (a trimpot and a couple of resistors).

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            • #21
              Nice. If one wanted to make one of these for an actual 2box module, I guess the piezo would be mounted in the bell, and you wouldn't have to cut bell switches, just edge switches?
              2Box Drumit5, DIY 12" Snare, 12" Floor Tom, 2x10" Toms. Acoustic cymbals w/DIY triggers, Triggera Krigg, Tama Iron Cobra Kick and Tama Roadpro HH stand. Tennis Ball Riser (not needed now I have the Krigg lol).

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              • #22
                Yes, that's right.

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                • #23
                  Brilliant. My parts are on their way, can't wait to build it :-).
                  Did you experience any wear of the vinlyl coating since you built it?
                  Anyway I'm going to apply the same method; as I understand it can be removed/replaced with some effort...
                  Also, did you apply some technique to prevent rotation of the cymbal?
                  Though if we could create a 'tricky' connection somehow on the mounting rod, it could even rotate.
                  Last edited by /Bal; 07-10-15, 04:44 AM.

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                  • #24
                    Hi,

                    No, it hasn't yet worn down as such, but it has started to split in some places around the edge - it's not noticeable unless you look closely, but it's there. This is happening because of the split sections around the edge: when you hit a segment it bends down slightly and separates from the adjacent segments along the cut lines. I want to put some sort of rubber around the edge but still haven't found anything I like. For my next go at it, I'll see if the edge segments can be done without altogether, the cymbal might have enough flex as it is without cutting it. I also intend to make fewer bell segments, say just 3 or 4. These changes will greatly simplify the mechanism and make it less prone to failure - not that any have failed yet, but I'd like to make them to last.

                    If you have to remove the vinyl later, just use a hair dryer. The heat softens it and makes it a breeze. Same for when you apply it - get someone to hold the dryer while you flatten out the wrinkles. The nice thing about the vinyl is that it's really cheap, easy to replace and there are loads of colours/finishes to choose from.

                    Anyway, best of luck!

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                    • #25
                      Thanks a lot, it's good to know. I try and do a 'dry run' instead of cutting the edge first, to see how it behaves. Meaning, I won't glue it together, just put/hold/check how it looks. As I imagine, the trick might be that if separator is used, how far from the edge it ends. Though, not sure if it's needed after your hihat post, but will see.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by /Bal View Post
                        Also, did you apply some technique to prevent rotation of the cymbal?
                        Though if we could create a 'tricky' connection somehow on the mounting rod, it could even rotate.
                        I don't use anything for the ride cymbal and the hi hats have a strip of velcro between them to prevent them from rotating away from each other and tugging on the cables coming from the top cymbal. The whole point of making the edge switches 360 was to be able to not worry about them rotating. The cables themselves, if fastened to the cymbal arm, and the weight of the project box, prevent the cymbal from rotating too much and make it return to its initial position.

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                        • #27
                          Well, that makes sense. Sometimes when focusing on the details, the big picture gets lost.
                          Though I was rather worried about the cables breaking, but then there shouldn't be such a big force from accidental rotation, so of course you're right...
                          The velcro is also a good idea, I read it once, but the goldfish effect made me forget
                          Do you think I should go with 10, 12 or less bell sections...? I tend to like 12, 'cause it's a nice number but whatever
                          Thanks again!
                          Last edited by /Bal; 07-14-15, 09:29 AM.

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                          • #28
                            I don't know how I ended up editing my previous entry, didn't mean to. So I'm undecided on the number of bell sections, but not in a hurry...

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                            • #29
                              The more sections, the more sensitive it'll be, though I think 10 or 12 won't make much of a noticeable difference. I used 10 and 12 for my cymbals but for the next iteration I think I'm going to go with just 4 or 6. Despite being fewer -and in principle, stiffer- sections, you can make them bend easier by making cuts perpendicular (following the circumference of the cymbal) to the base of the cuts coming down from the top of the bell. If that doesn't make sense I could make a picture of what I mean. The reasoning for making fewer of them is to make things simpler, thus less prone to failure.

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                              • #30
                                Yeah, I was thinking about the same and that makes me undecided

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