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best (quietest) cymbals for conversion?

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  • best (quietest) cymbals for conversion?

    Just thinking out loud here, after doing my first cymbal conversion - a 16" Meinl HCS and JMan's Stealth kit - the cymbal is definately deadened supremely well by the material underneath but the stick noise is quite a bit louder than the Roland rubber coated pads, as one would expect.

    It now seems obvious to me a thinner cymbal would help eliminate every bit of resonance. As of right now the only cheap thin crashes I'm familiar with are Wuhan.

    Update: 3/13

    I can confirm there's a very significant reduction in volume with thin cymbals, especially on edge strikes. With medium to heavy crashes there is a "donk" like sound on edge strikes and it is audible in my headphones. There is essentially none with thin crashes.


    Last edited by bud7h4; 03-14-15, 03:52 PM.
    TD-30 module, PDP A2E (22, 16, 14, 12, 10), Quartz triggers,
    VH11 hi-hat, PD125 (snare), Roland cymbals, Peavey KB4 monitor, Audio-Technica ATH-M50
    Axis A21 Sabres, Axis A Longboards

  • #2
    The acoustic cymbal used will not make much difference as far as the top stick tip noise. That is simply the noise that the stick is making on a deadened metal surface. There are several top cymbal mute pads available via retail you could use to stick on the top where you play the bow/bell if you want. Personally I use nothing on the tops of my cymbals as the noise doesn't bother me. But I did do a little video demo using a thin gum rubber piece on top of a cymbal as another DIY idea: http://www.vdrums.com/forum/advanced...als-video-demo
    I could tell you where to stick that piezo! ;)
    Stealthdrums.com Mega Kit: Pearl Mimic Pro ,2Box modules,drums and cymbals too many to count. VST quality sounds directly from the Mimic and custom sounds loaded into and played directly from the 2Box modules. Visit me anytime at: http://stealthdrums.com/

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    • #3
      Thanks a lot J, I'll try that. Materials should arrive by friday, I'll post my results.
      BTW I'm thrilled with the Stealth kits, I just want to cut all the acoustic volume I can since this is my home drum kit.
      TD-30 module, PDP A2E (22, 16, 14, 12, 10), Quartz triggers,
      VH11 hi-hat, PD125 (snare), Roland cymbals, Peavey KB4 monitor, Audio-Technica ATH-M50
      Axis A21 Sabres, Axis A Longboards

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by bud7h4 View Post
        Thanks a lot J, I'll try that. Materials should arrive by friday, I'll post my results.
        BTW I'm thrilled with the Stealth kits, I just want to cut all the acoustic volume I can since this is my home drum kit.
        Glad to help, and thanks for the kind words! J
        I could tell you where to stick that piezo! ;)
        Stealthdrums.com Mega Kit: Pearl Mimic Pro ,2Box modules,drums and cymbals too many to count. VST quality sounds directly from the Mimic and custom sounds loaded into and played directly from the 2Box modules. Visit me anytime at: http://stealthdrums.com/

        Comment


        • #5
          Jman, the rubber sheeting from Grainger did the trick, and it looks and feels extremely durable. Decided I'm going to use that on the ride since striking the bow feels reasonably crisp with this coating.

          For my crashes I've ordered some Pintech strike pads which they use on their cymbals. They're softer and likely not as durable as the gum rubber (which seems like it will last a lifetime) but they should be even more quiet.
          TD-30 module, PDP A2E (22, 16, 14, 12, 10), Quartz triggers,
          VH11 hi-hat, PD125 (snare), Roland cymbals, Peavey KB4 monitor, Audio-Technica ATH-M50
          Axis A21 Sabres, Axis A Longboards

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by bud7h4 View Post
            Jman, the rubber sheeting from Grainger did the trick, and it looks and feels extremely durable. Decided I'm going to use that on the ride since striking the bow feels reasonably crisp with this coating.

            For my crashes I've ordered some Pintech strike pads which they use on their cymbals. They're softer and likely not as durable as the gum rubber (which seems like it will last a lifetime) but they should be even more quiet.
            Thanks for the update. My impression of that gum rubber was similar. It seems durable, doesn't change the stick response/feel much and the triggering sensitivity is not affected significantly.
            I could tell you where to stick that piezo! ;)
            Stealthdrums.com Mega Kit: Pearl Mimic Pro ,2Box modules,drums and cymbals too many to count. VST quality sounds directly from the Mimic and custom sounds loaded into and played directly from the 2Box modules. Visit me anytime at: http://stealthdrums.com/

            Comment


            • #7
              I have the pintech strike pads on Jmans trigger metal cymbals. Please let me know which is quieter, the grainger product or the pintech, thanks

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              • #8
                Originally posted by hemiboy View Post
                I have the pintech strike pads on Jmans trigger metal cymbals. Please let me know which is quieter, the grainger product or the pintech, thanks

                Completed my second crash tonight using the Pintech strike pad on Jman's Stealth kit and it is excellent. Striking the pad on the bow is about the same volume as a roland drum pad! Much quieter than the factory rubber coated cymbals. The edge is about the same volume as Roland cymbals' edge, with the very slight resonance you would expect since it is a real cymbal under the insulation. The slightly audible resonance doesn't add volume, I'm just saying it's a different sound than the Roland plastic/rubber ones.

                If you add the edge guard strip supplied by Jman, which is plastic, edge strikes are not as quiet as the bare Pintech pad . Noticeably more audible than the Roland edge but it's well worth it because they will clearly protect the rubber padding for a long time (the edge of the rubber pads is where they are susceptible to wear).

                Trigger response is great with either coating, or for that matter with neither. My crashes turned out best though, with the Pintech pad applied. It gets less "hot" (which is a good thing) in this order: Bare, rubber, strike pad.

                One side note on the Pintech pads - the adhesive backing is superb.

                So, Jman's Stealth kits and Pintech strike pads is how I'm going to convert all of my cymbals, except for the ride.

                The gum rubber I bought from grainger doesn't dampen stick rebound as much as the softer Pintech pads so it's ideal for the ride. And it's still very quiet, about the same as Roland's cymbals, maybe even quieter. Note that this comparison is with regard to riding. If you give the bow a wack it's going to be a little louder than a Roland.

                If you buy rubber sheeting, make sure you get Killer Red tape as suggested by Jman. I bought 3M tape with my Grainger order and it's not nearly as strong. I was fortunate that it at least does seem like it will suffice.
                Last edited by bud7h4; 02-11-15, 11:02 PM.
                TD-30 module, PDP A2E (22, 16, 14, 12, 10), Quartz triggers,
                VH11 hi-hat, PD125 (snare), Roland cymbals, Peavey KB4 monitor, Audio-Technica ATH-M50
                Axis A21 Sabres, Axis A Longboards

                Comment


                • #9
                  Yeah, I went with the pintech strike pads with Jman stealth cymbals as well, great! I just have to make my ride a little hotte when i get a a chance

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