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snare drums question

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  • snare drums question

    I am going to buy 1 new snare drum.
    our band play hard rock/heavy metal mostly~~
    I saw a Ludwig bronze snare today with a good price.(rocker series snare I think), It is 5x14.
    will this kind of snare fit our genre???
    (the drum I saw is not tuned up yet....so I havent test it)

  • #2
    when i was playing a hard/bluesrock kind of thing, the lugwig bronze 6 1/2 x 14 was the one i used. ended up tradeing it for a cherry sonar snare.

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    • #3
      Although I like shallow snare drums (more rattle) a 6,5 inch deep snare will have more power for your type of music.
      Robert

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      • #4
        Thanks all!!
        All snare in all shops in HK is not tuned......I think they wont let me tune it up....

        I still think of buying a ludwig cheap bronze snare(5x14)......or a DW 6.5x14 (brass or copper.....which better??what is the different???)

        All is $$$$$$$$.........
        make me crazy.....

        Originally posted by c. jude:
        As the others have said, I think a deeper snare is more suitable. But whatever you do, don't buy before you try...anything.

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        • #5
          Between cost and raw cutting power, I'd say a steel-shell 6.5 X 14 snare would be your best bang-for-the-buck, dude. It is kinda the standard for rock music, is probably the cheapest (depending on brand), and has enough cut to chop down a rainforest.

          Bronze is beautiful (my current favorite snare is my DW 5 X 14 "Black Beauty"-style bronze), but for big rock sound and sheer volume, the steel-shell 6.5 X 14 would probably be more suitable.

          Like c.jude said, try it. If they won't let you tune it up, I wouldn't buy it. That's like buying a car without test-driving - insane!

          Just an opinion,

          -Danny
          -Danny

          Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life.

          Comment


          • #6
            dear fartnokker and all,
            thanks for your advice,
            I have narrow my selection.....($$$ consideration)
            A pearl steel snare need USD$141 (HKD$1100)
            A ludwig bronze need USD$167 (HKD$1300)
            both are 6.5x14
            Which one would you recommend???
            (I currently own a 5x13 pearl steel snare, a taye 6.5x14 all maple<-----I like it!!)


            Originally posted by fartnokker:
            Between cost and raw cutting power, I'd say a steel-shell 6.5 X 14 snare would be your best bang-for-the-buck, dude. It is kinda the standard for rock music, is probably the cheapest (depending on brand), and has enough cut to chop down a rainforest.

            Bronze is beautiful (my current favorite snare is my DW 5 X 14 "Black Beauty"-style bronze), but for big rock sound and sheer volume, the steel-shell 6.5 X 14 would probably be more suitable.

            Like c.jude said, try it. If they won't let you tune it up, I wouldn't buy it. That's like buying a car without test-driving - insane!

            Just an opinion,

            -Danny

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            • #7
              cpgrossman,
              oh......
              why you hate it???
              how bad is it??
              I think I am going to buy a same one......

              Originally posted by cpgrossman:
              when i was playing a hard/bluesrock kind of thing, the lugwig bronze 6 1/2 x 14 was the one i used. ended up tradeing it for a cherry sonar snare.

              Comment


              • #8
                My favourite at the moment is a Pearl 14 x 3.5 Maple Free-floating Pico - really cuts through and lovely sensitivity.

                For the bigger sound I generally use my 14 X 8 Free-floater, though to be honest it's dawned on me over the years that alot of the low end depth justs gets lost: maybe 6.5 is enough to get the balance right. I also tend to find I'm cranking it right up to get the right feel and this also reduces the enhancement of the low end....also have a Pearl steel 13 x 3 which is nice for the funkier end of things: lovely bright ring to it...

                Just some thoughts!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by drummercat:
                  cpgrossman,
                  oh......
                  why you hate it???
                  how bad is it??
                  I think I am going to buy a same one......

                  dude:I did not hate it, I loved it.I dont play pop/rock any more.(and I have a killer 5 1/2 x14 steel if i need it) I could not pass up a 1968 teardrop lug sonar wood 5 1/2 x 14 w/ psyh silver finish and matching stand (my baby)

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                  • #10
                    Currently I use a generic 13" x 3.5" Dixon maple piccolo...It cuts great, and sounds fine with the DW toms and kick... Not a bad drum for $95 US...and it looks decent too...

                    In situations where I need a fat, deep snare, I trigger it.

                    Erik
                    SEPdrums

                    [This message has been edited by sepdrums (edited June 18, 2002).]

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                    • #11
                      Finally I got a Ludwig 6.5x14 Bronze snare (the cheap one)

                      how to tune it fat???
                      which drum head???

                      thanks again!!!


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                      • #12
                        Usually going with Remo, I'd recommend an Ambassador snare-side head (not a batter!), and on top, a coated Powerstroke 3 w/dot. Nice, wide tuning range, and controlled sound. Cut out about a 1"-wide mylar ring from an old snare head, and use that for ring control & general fatness if desired.

                        I use the homemade zero-ring for mic'd and recording situations, and go without for live acoustic (unamplified) playing. It'll take some of the high metal overtones out, and make a dry, fat sound. I think you'll like it. Have fun, bro!

                        -Danny
                        -Danny

                        Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          As for tuning the drum "fat", there are different schools of thought out there, but what I generally do is to tune the snare-side (resonant) head to no more than medium tightness. This side not only affects the tone of the drum, but the volume & snare response. Y'see, if the head is too tight, it won't travel as far when the batter is struck, and won't create as much impact with the snare strainer. Tune it too tight, and you choke the snare.

                          As for the top head, I go with medium-tight on my brass snare. Looser tuning usually equates to "fatter" sound, but you can start getting some resonant overtones from the shell that may be desirable or undesirable - try it and see.

                          For the batter head, tighter tension gives crisper response, a higher-pitched tone... less body, more crack. Looser tension gives more body & depth.

                          I generally tune my bottom head a little looser than the top on snare drums, just the opposite of what I usually do for toms. Stick response is generally quite good this way. Each drum will respond differently to tuning, based on many factors, so a little experimentation will be beneficial.

                          Wood snares, I generally crank the top head a little more, as they are warmer & the extra top tension adds to the cutting power. On metal snares, tho, there is cut for days, so you shouldn't have a problem there. If you crank up the head tension too tight on a metal snare, you can get the ringy "timbale" effect and a reduction in volume.

                          Play with the tuning a bit, and the character of the drum will make itself known to you. After dingling around a little, you'll find the ideal tuning for that drum to suit your taste. Enjoy it!

                          -Danny
                          -Danny

                          Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life.

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