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Rockstar or Starclassic?

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  • Rockstar or Starclassic?

    I play a tama Swingstar 5 piece. I'm thinking of upgrading to a rockstar or starclassic. Out of musicians friend they offer a 9 piece rockstar for 1800 or a 5 piece starclassic for 15 or 1600 hundred. Is there any real difference between the two as far a quality or sound goes?
    td-6, pro-mark, remo, sabian, dw, tama rockstar.

  • #2
    Starclassic is Tamas top of the line kit. I think they are great drums and the bass drums kill....I would definately take this.....much beter drums....
    Roland V-Pro TD20 expanded with V Expressions
    Presonus Firepod
    Reaper
    Acoustic- Spaun drums, Dunnett snare & Paiste Signature Series Cymbals.

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    • #3
      Couple o' things to consider, I guess... What does your playing/music style dictate as far as setup? Is a 5-piece kit adequate, or do you need a half-dozen toms?

      Also, the style of music you play can favor one or another of the shell compositions. More open , acoustic stuff might favor the maple (Starclassic) kit for the full tone with long sustain, whereas rock music might favor the principally mahogany shells of the Rockstar kit, which tend to give a deep, thick sound.

      If you like a bottom-heavy low sound, the Rockstar might impress you more than the more expensive Starclassic kit. The modern Rockstar kit has good construction, great quality hardware, and some nice finishes. The overall quality of the Rockstar kit is usually good enough to record and gig with, no problem.

      If you plan on putting on double-ply heads like Remo Pinstripes, definitely go with the Rockstar, 'cause it'll emphasize the type of tone you're going for.

      Gotta get what you like, though. My best advice is to check 'em both out at a local music store. Don't be fooled by prices; notice that Pearl recently introduced a "high-end" Masters-series kit made of Mahogany, since that wood has been used for years to get great tone before the widespread use of maple on top-of-the-line kits came into vogue.

      I'd generally say that if you have to ask, you'll probably want the Rockstar kit, and I don't mean that in a snotty way. Go play 'em both, if you can, and do some research before spending that kinda cash.

      Good luck, and I'm sure you'll enjoy whatever new kit you get!

      -Danny
      -Danny

      Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life.

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      • #4
        I think IndustrialDrummer is referring to the Starclassic Performer and not the top line Starclassic series.

        Both are budget kits and sound more or less the same. If the Starclassic Performer has full maple or birch shells (I didn't check this out), then realize that this maple or birch is not the same maple and birch wood the top lines are using. Sonor also uses Italian maple for their Force 3000 series which is less dense (and strong) than the North American maple. Same with Tawainese maple.

        Both the Rockstar and Starclassic Performer drums have a limited tuning range (because of the wood and construction). However: with some pinstripe heads on it you can get a decent fat sound. Good enough for most applications. Read again what Fartnokker says about this. It's true...
        Robert

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        • #5
          Cool. Thanks for the info. It seems like the Rockstar would be better suited for my playing and price range.
          td-6, pro-mark, remo, sabian, dw, tama rockstar.

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          • #6
            You guys were right; I made some (premature) assumptions about which Starclassic kit. Like Putt pointed out, there is lots of variation, even within similar wood types.

            I'm not a big fan of birch kits, either (they sound kinda choked to me), even though I own one. I'm building a maple kit, too, so I can have that sound as well. The mahogany is usually thick & warm, though, and there's lots to be said for that.

            I checked the Tama site, and think the Rockstar Custom drums look very nice, but I'm guessing the choices are between the standard Rockstar and the Starclassic Performer.
            I'd go with c.jude and probably suggest the Rockstar, but I still think you should demo both kits if possible before buying. The Rockstar is definitely the most bang for the buck, though.

            -Danny


            [This message has been edited by fartnokker (edited February 04, 2002).]
            -Danny

            Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life.

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            • #7
              To bad your not in the Dallas area, I have a rockstar in 8,10,12,14,16 & 22 inch sizes with a 13 inch Yamaha snare I'd let go cheap (450 bucks) just to get them out of my way (need to make room for another kit). Basically brand new.

              The Rockstar is not a bad sounding kit at all. But if you can get a Starclassic Maple kit for 1.5k, jump on it! Sounds like a juggle between quality and quanity? There's no comparison between the two. You will not be dissapointed. I have a kit and the kick has a whollup that HAS to be heard, man!

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              • #8
                The Starclassic Performer is Tama's top-line kit, with the same construction as the maple version, only it has less colour and size options due to more people preferring the sound of maple and therefor more people buying maple. For me, the SCP is the best kit in the world, it sounds astonishing, looks great, and has unsurpassed build quality, and is great value because birch is cheaper than maple. The Rockstar is a mid-range kit, which is the best as far as mid-range goes, but if you want the elite, go Starclassic.

                Zomoniac

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by lainchbury:
                  The Starclassic Performer is Tama's top-line kit, with the same construction as the maple version, only it has less colour and size options due to more people preferring the sound of maple and therefor more people buying maple.
                  I don't think so. If you look at the differences in price, Tama appearantly uses another kind of maple.

                  Perhaps Tama uses the Americam Hard rock maple for their (top line) Starclassic and Japanese maple (less dense, more soft) for the Starclassic Performer series. There is a difference in sound and tuning range between those 2 maples. Believe me...
                  Robert

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by puttenvr:


                    Perhaps Tama uses the Americam Hard rock maple for their (top line) Starclassic and Japanese maple (less dense, more soft) for the Starclassic Performer series.
                    The Performers are Birch
                    TD-8, Pintech pads, Pearl rack, Mackie SRM-450, Behringer 802 mixer and DSP1400 UltraMizer, Electric Sticks.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Schmunk:
                      The Performers are Birch
                      Correct. I already doubted; hence I said perhaps Tama uses .... But in the meantime I checked my database. The Starclassic performers had basswood shells with a birch interior and exterior ply (a sandwich construction) and Tama changed it to full birch a year ago.

                      Nevertheless my goal was to contradict lainchbury's statement that the Starclassic Performers and Starclassic are of the same construction. Just to avoid misunderstandings.
                      Robert

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by puttenvr View Post
                        I don't think so. If you look at the differences in price, Tama appearantly uses another kind of maple.

                        Perhaps Tama uses the Americam Hard rock maple for their (top line) Starclassic and Japanese maple (less dense, more soft) for the Starclassic Performer series. There is a difference in sound and tuning range between those 2 maples. Believe me...
                        I'm thinking of buying a gretsch catalina maple kit. (that's all I can afford) I've heard that this kit is made from japanese maple. Any idea if this is true?
                        I know the American Hard rock maple is more superior than japanese maple, but can you compare these two maples by describing how they sound?
                        Last edited by drum_nut; 04-02-07, 04:34 AM.

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