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Vdrums with a real hi-hat?

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  • Vdrums with a real hi-hat?

    I've got a TD-6KFV kit with the V-11 hi-hat (the one that sits on a real hi-hat stand). Now, I'm only an amateur - I don't play in bands or in a studio, I'm just taking lessons right now. I'm starting to get into more complex hi-hat patterns, like accented off-beats, etc. I find that the V-11 seems to be a little slow responding, and not as precise as I would like. It also spins as I play it, so that once in awhile there is a quiet spot where I hit it. I was debating whether to swap it for acoustic hats.

    Does anyone else have problems like this? Has anyone tried this (acoustic hats with the Vdrums?) What type of cymbal works well with the kit? I thought I would probably need a 13" pair, other than that I haven't a clue.
    I can go try some combinations at the music store, but I thought I'd look here for advice first.

    Thanks!
    Dave

  • #2
    The VH-11 shouldn't spin if your hi-hat stand rod is tightened to the pedal. Any acoustic hi-hat cymbals would work, but then at some stage you would probably have to think about putting a microphone near them and mixing that with your V-drums sounds.


    Bruce

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    • #3
      The hi-hat is probably the weakest link when it comes to edrums of any stripe. The Roland VH11 and VH12 are the pinacle of that technology, and some even prefer the VH11 over the VH12. Lots of people do what you are talking about - go accoustic for the cymbals - because the nuance and expression are so much better. I would say if you are looking for an identical feel with an electronic hat, you will be disappointed.

      If noise is not an issue and you are wanting all the range of sound, freedom from quirky behavior, etc., go for the accoustic hat.
      Id rather be told the ugly truth than handed a pretty lie.

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      • #4
        I was thinking of going the complete opposite direction. Playing an acoustic set and V cymbals. Higher frequency of the cymbals would not require huge speakers and I could just bring my V drum brain. Plus it would be real cost efficient. Cymbals are the most expensive part of a kit and you can spend half the value of a kit just trying to get 1 ride that sounds anywhere as good. Anyone done this?
        TD-6v, (3x)CY-8, (4x)PD-8's (2x)PD-6's (1x)PD-80R (1)KD-8 http://www.cstoliker.com/Drums/

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        • #5
          Part of the problem is also the module. You'll get much better response with a TD-12 or 20. I love the Hart Epedal II with my Td-12. Some little jazzy things I can't do like playing spang a lang open/closed using the left hand to close them and playing underneath the hats. But for most things, they feel pretty close to acoustic.


          http://tinyurl.com/My-E-kit

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          • #6
            I miss a real set of hi hats.. really miss the response from real cymbals too.... BUT.. My sticks last like forever now and my drums don't get sawdust on them.
            sigpic
            www.myspace.com/darrinmiranda

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            • #7
              When gigging with Vs I tend to use acoustic cymbals and snare (actually I run an e-snare and acoustic). I think that acoustic cymbals are hard to emulate in the electronic world as you can gain incredibly subtle differences with every cymbal depending on how you play them - I just don't think the technology is quite there yet. The hybrid set up works well for me - however smaller venues (which I don't frequent much anymore) work better with an all E arrangement.

              Of course I should probabaly point out here that I haven't taken the Vs on the road for quite a while now - acoustics have (temporarily) won my heart back. However, I do concede that each setup has its advantages and my heart is a fickle creature depending on the band/gig.
              Steve

              'I only ever quote myself - except when I quote someone else' - me

              , plenty of , and , , triggered acoustics, , and a plethora of PA blah blah freakin blah...I mean does anyone care about the specifics of pedals, speakers, processors, hardware or anything that I'm using?? :confused: Hmmm, maybe this is an appropriate place to mention that I tried out a new cymbal stand the other day...

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              • #8
                Acoustic hihat

                When I gig in public, I use a real hihat. Actually, all my cymbals are real. My kick, snare and two floor toms are acoustic, but triggered with Roland acoustic triggers. Rack toms are PD-120's.

                While I love my Roland e-drums, I'm still more comfortable with real cymbals and real hihat.

                In church everything is electronic due to stage and house volume; so I do play both types of cymbals. I use Smartigger e-cymbals. One of my main concerns regarding the e-cymbals is durability. I smack 'em pretty hard and the trigger is directly underneath where the stick strikes the cymbal. My next e-cym will be the Visulite. I've read good things about them.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Darrin64 View Post
                  My sticks last like forever now and my drums don't get sawdust on them.
                  LOL, that is one thing I noticed as well when I had my Roland V-Custom set. I also no longer had to hit the living hell out of my drums, did not have to wrap my sticks in grip tape and like you did not have sawdust all over the place...AND YES...I used the same pair of 5B Vic Firth's for about 6yrs!!!
                  Alesis DM10 [eventually], DW Hardware, Promark 5B's

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