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  • Definitions please.

    Could someone explain what these two terms mean? I've heard them used often when adjusting parameters and/or evaluating pads.

    1. Buzz roll.

    2. Press roll.

    Thnx,

  • #2
    Marc.,

    I really don't know that there is a difference between the two, correct me if I'm wrong. A standard roll is your countable stroke rolls. 5 stroke, 7 stroke, so on. More open and evenly stroked doubles.

    A buzz or press roll is much more closed strokes and very tight. Played with the sticks tip barely coming off the head. Just as the name implies, bzzzzzzzzz. You couldn't count the strokes if you tried.

    Does this hack explanation help?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by BtnkBndt:
      ... don't know that there is a difference between the two, correct me if I'm wrong.
      Can't, I'm the one askin', remember? However, if no one else disputes your explanation, I'll buy it. In my understanding a roll was, like, you know, like you said, where you can't count the strokes, like when something is being introduced and someone says "drum roll, please", etc. I didn't know about countable rolls, but there you go, I don't read drum sheet music (yet) like alot of y'all. I've seen it and it's like greek compared to piano (to me). Thanx BeatNik.

      -----
      - -

      Comment


      • #4
        BtnkBndt is right as far as I'm concerned. A good skill to have, but not one I normally use (except for "drum roll please", but even that a lot of the time is a really fast double-stroke).

        The trick for me to know that I am not "cheating" by just doing a press/buzz roll instead of actual controlled strokes, is to slow it down and speed it up without a noticeable change in the WAY it's being executed. When done on hi-hats, my friend refers to it as "hot buttered hi-hats". Double strokes are my best friends. But I can't do a proper paradiddle on purpose, though I probably do them all the time and just don't realize it.

        Also, press rolls can be done one-handed for really quiet multi-hit ghost notes. Very common in jazz. Not usually a contolled "roll" just more of a light, fast bounce on the snare head in between accents.

        I am SO untrained. or

        Hope that helps clarify.
        redbrick
        My Updated Website: https://blades.technology

        Comment


        • #5
          They mean the same thing - another term is crush roll or closed roll vs. open roll which is rudimental style
          Originally posted by Marc.:
          Could someone explain what these two terms mean? I've heard them used often when adjusting parameters and/or evaluating pads.

          1. Buzz roll.

          2. Press roll.

          Thnx,

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Marc.:
            Can't, I'm the one askin', remember? - -
            You mean I don't win nothing!

            I thought this was a quiz or something, Damnit

            Comment


            • #7
              I agree that the two terms refer to the same technique. But here's another idea to add to the mix...

              I took lessons from a guy a few years ago who works in the percussion section for the Virginia Symphony (obviously we worked on a lot of snare drum stuff, rather than drum kit stuff). All I knew were double stroke rolls and buzz rolls--that is, as rolls go. He showed me something that's a little more accurate than a buzz roll; it's the triple-stroke roll, and it's the roll technique that they use most when playing snare drum in an orchestral setting. He did it really well, too. I didn't really see a need for me to focus on it, though.

              Josh T

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              • #8
                I thought there was a difference between buzz and press rolls, i.e. a press roll was a much harder (pressure-wise) buzz roll...a louder press roll...really playing into the head. I'm not sure where I got this idea but that's what stuck.

                Also, are open-stroke rolls double stroke rolls where the second stroke is accented greater that the first? Or is that the closed?

                It's been a while since I had a lesson...

                DJourg


                [This message has been edited by DJourg (edited February 24, 2001).]

                Comment


                • #9
                  open and closed rolls can be notated.EX-A 5 stroke roll open has-- 5 strokes, however closed it has 3-er.. buzzed notes. 5=3 You can do this for all open and closed rolls.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I get what your saying, CPG; though I'm not sure if I'm talking about the same thing. What I was referring to is this:

                    Whereas the normal double stroke goes like this: rr ll rr ll rr ll etc. with each stroke the same velocity...

                    I was asking what you call this:

                    rR lL rR lL rR lL

                    where the capitalized letters represent a louder stroke (tap TAP tap TAP and so on).

                    This is academic, really, Marc's question just piqued my curiosity.

                    DJourg

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by DJourg:
                      I was asking what you call this:

                      rR lL rR lL rR lL

                      where the capitalized letters represent a louder stroke (tap TAP tap TAP and so on).

                      A flam.


                      Remarkable that people spent thousands of dollars to an e-drum and don't know the rudiments for drumming. Drive a Rolls Royce and get your license afterwards.
                      Robert

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        A flam would actually be like this:
                        lR rL lR rL
                        That is unless some of you are doing one handed flams?

                        What DJourg is describing looks to be just a strangely accented roll.

                        I agree with Putt. Rudiments are a must in my book. They even make snare heads these days with the rudiments printed right there. Learn them people, they will do wanders for your playing.

                        Just out of curiosity, how many here were actually members of the National Association of Rudimental Drummers way back when? I still have my certificate framed and on the wall. It was a sad day when they folded.

                        Drive a Rolls Royce and get your license afterwards
                        This type thing happens alot in the states. One day I picked a guy up out of the bushes. Had just watched him wobble a brand new one of them bent over rice rocket motorcycles off the road trying to turn a slight curve. His excuse "I just got my license, I've never actually rode a motorcycle before today". And you wander why insurance rates on sport vehicles is so high?

                        Next one was a lady I watched pull out of a dealership parkinglot on a full dresser Harley. Same thing! Sort of funny ain't it?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Don't get me mad, Putt. I know what a flam is. I know what a double-stroke roll is. Paradiddle, double paradiddle, paradiddle-diddle, ruff etc. (I forget Lesson #26, however). Be careful when you make these assumptions about your fellow v-ites. What you said was quite insulting.

                          Now. If you had read my posts more carefully what I was trying to describe is a variation on a double stroke roll. My little 'rR lL etc.' illustration appears to be similar to how flams are written, I'll admit, but I think I was clear about what I was trying to describe. I know the difference between a double stroke roll and a flam, thank you.

                          In lieu of an apology I will accept flowers (tulips, I suppose?)



                          [This message has been edited by DJourg (edited February 26, 2001).]

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by puttenvr:
                            Remarkable that people spent thousands of dollars to an e-drum and don't know the rudiments for drumming. Drive a Rolls Royce and get your license afterwards.
                            Rob, I have never had a drum lesson in my life and, to be honest, couldn't tell a flam from paradildo. However, it has not kept me from being in a large number of very successful and profitable bands throughout my life. At 14-15 our trio was pullin' in U.S. $300 (that's 300 1967 duckets) from school soc-hops and house-partys. A c-note/night for a few hours of enjoyin' myself & gettin kids onto the dance floor to enjoy themselves ain't too bad for a 14 year-old, snot-nosed never-had-a-lesson long-hair in my book.

                            I know that formal lessons would teach me to understand all of the $hit I do behind my set, but, after all these years, will lessons actually improve my drumming? Anyone?

                            Thnx for all the responses gang.

                            ~~~~~~~~~~

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Hi Marc.
                              I think there is always more to learn and lessons can be great from good teachers. I teach a little and even learn from the student, although it may be only from revisiting what I already know (sometimes).

                              My .02 db

                              [This message has been edited by dlbarnes99 (edited February 26, 2001).]
                              "As a scientist, Throckmorten knew, if he were ever to break wind in the echo chamber, he would never hear the end of it."

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