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  • Muffle rings (real topic!)

    Does anyone *not* use Remo rings (or the like) on their acoustic kits? No matter how I tune my drums (Pearl Export Pros), the sound is somewhat boomy and has unwanted resonances, incl. the snare. (I replaced all heads with Remo pinstripes already!) When I put on these tiny rings of plastic, the sound tightens beautifully without sounding muffled. Just wondering if anyone *doesn't* use them, as the sound is so much cleaner with them.

  • #2
    I played a set of DW Workshop series tubs in the local shop and they sounded so great with the OEM heads, I would never deny the world the sound of those drums by adding ANYTHING to them... I'm not talking about annoying overtones, I'm talking pure TONE... beautiful.

    Open is the way to play, and every drum has a great sound in it... The hard part is finding the exact right head/tuning combination to let it sing!

    rus
    \oo/_ :mad: _\oo/

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    • #3
      In the 1970s when multi-track recording was used frequently (the technique was already invented in the late 1950s) it hardly became 'a must' to muffle every single part of the drum kit. The dead sound became popular and even special drum heads and muffle rings were made for it.

      Thanks to electronic drums, Phil Collins and a few other drummers the 1980s started with a more open drum sound. In the late 1990s we even returned to thinner drum shells and one-ply drumheads, which were able to produce a clear sound without any dampening at all.

      I can imagine that a budget kit like the Pearl Export has its frequencies focussed on the lower and mid tones. High end drums - made from good wood - have a broader frequency and tuning range. Perhaps you need to muffle your drums, but adding a plastic ring (Remo) and some foam to a drum always will kill the sound. It is better to experiment with turning back one or two tension rods. So, I agree with the statement that you better can let the drums sound open.

      Even today some sound engineers tend to like a muffled sound 'cause it's much easier for them to control a dead sound. But let them solve their problems. They have their tone control, compressors, limiters, noise gates etc to make a decent sound out of every drum. It's only a question of skill-ness. Can they do the job?

      Open sounding drums always have extra body and tone-collor to set through. Especially on a distance or in a large room. Same with cymbals: you don't muffle them. Do you?

      I only muffle my bass drum a bit and ofcourse my ddrums
      Robert

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      • #4
        Rus stole my thunder!! I have a beautiful DW Collectors kit that I use wide open. I tune the bottome head just a tad higher than the top head. No nasty overtones or ringing. I do have some foam in the kick though not alot...
        Roland V-Pro TD20 expanded with V Expressions
        Presonus Firepod
        Reaper
        Acoustic- Spaun drums, Dunnett snare & Paiste Signature Series Cymbals.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Steve Gardner:
          Rus stole my thunder!! I have a beautiful DW Collectors kit that I use wide open. I tune the bottome head just a tad higher than the top head. No nasty overtones or ringing. I do have some foam in the kick though not alot...
          My next acoustic kit is going to be DW Workshop... Those things are amazing (I can't hear a difference from the Collectors and the Workshops are almost half the price...

          DW Rules.
          rus

          \oo/_ :mad: _\oo/

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          • #6
            For the most part, my acoustic drums (toms and snare) are wide open- no muffling. However, on occasion I do use a product (forgot the name) that's made out of gel and sticks to the drum head. It comes in small squares (about 1" x 2") and they are tacky, so there is no adhesive necessary and they don't leave a residue. They can be placed anywhere on the head you want and are useful in controlling overtones or ringing. They are even sticky enough to place on the bottom head. They come in a set of four or five pads, and are pretty cheap. I got mine at Guitar Center.

            For what it's worth, I use Remo muffle rings in addition to an old pillow to muffle my bass drum.


            ------------------
            Eric Sands
            webmaster - vdrums.com

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            • #7
              Have you tried the Maxi-pad trick on your toms? It works for some kits but not all the time. Also tuning is the biggest factor to getting rid of that boomy sound, My Tama Rockstar had the same problem. I suggest checking the RhyhtmTech memokey if you are having some tuning problems. It's basically just like a guitar tuner but for your drums.

              *synthetic*

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              • #8
                I tried one of those real little Mapex kits. I think it had 8, 10 & 14 inch toms & a 20" kick. Wide open, those things sang! I didn't mind that the kick drum was only 20". It had a beautiful tone. The toms had a certain fullness to them that made up for their small size. I'm going to go for one of those kits next.

                To convince my wife, I told her they were kid drums for my son. However, my son will also "get" a nice new set of Zildjians with his "toy" kit! :
                WMP


                (Weapon of Mass Percussion)

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                • #9
                  I say go wide open no mufflinginging , experiment with tune in em . One very good tool I found when I had a place to play my acoustics was this thing called a drum torquer , it looks like an oversize screw about 8" long with a dial on the top with # from 0 to 20 . It really made my TAMA'S come to life ,I always thought I did a decent job tuning by ear but the Drum torquer allowed me to adjust every lug to the exact same tension all the way around the head top and bottom ,comes with an attachment so you can do the wingnut style lug on your bass drums also. Worth looking into for those who still play acoustics , cuts down on the time spent tuning and your drum sound will thank you for it. Be sure to lubricate all your male and female parts of the lug assembly befor tuning for optimal results.
                  ~**REDMAN**~
                  ~REDMAN~

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                  • #10
                    [QUOTE]Originally posted by drmoze:
                    [B]Does anyone *not* use Remo rings (or the like) on their acoustic kits?

                    Like all the guys say, i'm a big fan of "open". I've got a lovely set of Premier XPK's. After reading an article in rhythmn magazine i spent a whole saturday afternoon "playing" with my kit, and have worked on this ever since.

                    The principle is simple. Each shell has a given natural frequency, depending on depth and width. This remains constant.

                    Starting with one skin:
                    The natural frequency of a given skin depends completely on it's tension. It's important that you are only listening to the sound the head makes. Hit it gently, tap taping around the skin. As you increase the tension then at some point the natural frequency of the skin is the same as the natural frequency of the shell. This gives you maximum "boom". Continue to tighten the head and the boom disappears to a more poppy sound.

                    Now, if you have a skin underneath you can do the same with this. tune it to the same sound as the shell and top head, and you get maximum "boom". Just below or just above will have a muting effect. Any more than that and you'll get various harmonics which may or maynot lead to a desireable sound.

                    The secret is a bit of "systematic play". Learn how to set up one drum like this and you'll soon be able to do the rest of the kit to your desired sound. Use your ears and you'll be sorted.

                    "Booming IS the new Damped"

                    Jonna

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                    • #11
                      Is this topic Muffle Rings or Muff Rings? Doesn't that hurt? The next thing I know... we're talking about torqueing and lubricating the male and female parts. What gives???
                      WMP


                      (Weapon of Mass Percussion)

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                      • #12
                        I used to use a home made muffle ring on my snare drum. I took one of my old broken snare skins and cut the middle out of it(I also removed the metal ring on the outside of the skin). It worked perfectly. Just as good as the remo's.

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                        • #13
                          You have to read between the lines < matts64>
                          ~REDMAN~

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                          • #14
                            do yourself the biggest favor you"ll ever do as a drummer: buy the tama tension watch. it measures the head tension not the bolt tension. i play yamaha maples 10,12,14,16, and i tune them(TOPS AND BOTTOMS) at 55 on the dial. i get the most copliments from other drummers on how great they sound. this will be the best 75.00 you ever spent

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                            • #15
                              A couple of thoughts on this...
                              I have a Drum Dial. It is the same thing, but I don't think I am sold on that concept as much as you. I will use mine for changing heads and to get me in the ballpark. Because of the all of the variables, I stop there and let my ears take me through the final tweaking stage. Drum Dials and Tesion watches do have a purpose, but they will never be the final word on my tuning.
                              Roland V-Pro TD20 expanded with V Expressions
                              Presonus Firepod
                              Reaper
                              Acoustic- Spaun drums, Dunnett snare & Paiste Signature Series Cymbals.

                              Comment

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