Welcome! If this is your first visit, you will need to register to participate.

DO NOT use symbols in usernames. Doing so will result in an inability to sign in & post!

If you cannot sign in or post, please visit our Forum Talk section for answers to frequently asked questions.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Will my acoustics collect dust

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Will my acoustics collect dust

    Right now I'm playing a Yamaha recording custom 7 pc. If and when I get my e drums will my acoustics collect dust? If so would it be worth selling the Yamahas and just go for the td-20? It's the same with digital cameras...when I bought my first digital camera I held on to my 35 mm and haven't touched it since. Lately I'm having a hard time playing my drums in the house, with 3 kids and a wife I'm getting complaints about the noise. I even have a sound proof room that cuts down about 80% of the "noise" but I guess thats not enough. plus my wife wants to move me out of there because she says my son needs his own room.... imagine that.
    [SIGPIC]

  • #2
    vdrum rescue

    i feel ya man.

    If you are not a " recording often" type of player - sell your yams to get the v pro s kit. Remember to upgrade your TD20 with the EXP card when it becomes avail!

    Check out the TD9 set as well before you buy.

    Best of luck with all that.

    Comment


    • #3
      It's a tough call. If you play live, then I'd suggest keeping the acoustic kit... I use my acoustic for band practice and playing live, but the TD-20 is perfect for home practice and recording. I live in a semi-detached house though, so I've never played the acoustic at home
      TD-20 V-Pro Kit
      Yamaha Tour Custom / Zildjian K Customs and A Customs
      DW / Yamaha Hardware / DW5000 Double Pedal
      Yamaha 01x / i88x

      Comment


      • #4
        I think it all comes down to this. Keep the acoustic if:

        1. You can afford to buy a TD-20 without the need to sell the acoustic for money to help finance the purchase.

        2. You have the space to keep both kits set up at home or to properly store the acoustic.

        If you aren't overly attached to the acoustic, you could always sell it off and buy a new acoustic later if you find that you miss it or need it. But, if you don't play the acoustic out for gigs and the wife is going to kick you out of your drum room soon, I think the TD-20 will be more than enough to keep you busy and happy.

        Something else to consider is converting your acoustic kit to electronic. Lots of folks in the DIY section can give you good advice on that project. It will save you a lot of money and will allow you to keep the acoustic kit. There are ways to do the conversion such that you'll be able to convert them back to acoustics if you wish.

        Best of luck.
        >>>See my E-kit here<<<

        >>>See my A-kit here<<<

        Comment


        • #5
          harts

          How do you like your harts? I cant decide between Hart or roland
          [SIGPIC]

          Comment


          • #6
            Q: Will my A's collect dust?

            A: Probably 95% of the time.


            -you'll feel a it of longing for your a-drums every once in a while...then go right back to your e's.

            That's what I did anyway. Practice your chops on a practice pad or pillow or snare drum though. I found I get really lazy playing my e's due to the added bounce.!!


            E
            - your source for electronic cigs. Use coupon code "" for 10% off every order!!!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by snick59 View Post
              How do you like your harts? I cant decide between Hart or roland
              They're an older model that I picked up used at a pretty good deal. I've been quite happy with them. Happy enough that if and when I get to upgrade kits again, I'll likely go with a Hart Pro kit (with TD-20 module) over the full TD-20 kit. That's not to knock Roland - good stuff all around - but I kind of like having something a little bit different.
              >>>See my E-kit here<<<

              >>>See my A-kit here<<<

              Comment


              • #8
                I would keep the acoustic set. I think there's something to be said for the difference in feel and sound. I also think if you want to jam with some other musicians an acoustic set becomes invaluable. Just my $.02
                sigpic

                http://www.silverdragonsound.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  My old acoustics haven't moved from the shed since my TD-20 came along and usurped them. I just can't see the point in getting them out. They're big and heavy and a pain in the butt to move, they require constant maintenance, they take up a hell of a lot more room than my TD-20, and they're WAY TOO LOUD!!! Then there's the hours and hours needed to get them properly mic'd up for recording and I can rarely get them to sound anywhere near as good as my V's anyway. My opinion then? The analogy between a digital and an SLR camera is a great one!! I don't really even think there's a choice to make in your situation, chuck those A's and go for the top of the range V's.. If you do it properly, I guarantee you won't even miss them

                  Aaron
                  "Today young men on acid realised that all matter is purely energy condensed to a slow vibration; That we are all of one consciousness experiencing itself subjectively; There's no such thing as death, life is only a dream and we're the imagination of ourselves.. Here's Tom with the weather"...

                  TD-20 + TMC-6 + VF-1 + Gen16's = Not enough inputs.
                  Watch me - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WLqt6zaAYkY

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hi Snick,

                    I would say that the acoustics will probably collect a bit of dust. I know between my 2 kids, wife, and neighbors the acoustics got to be a little much. Luckily my father in law insulated his garage and threw in an ac/heater, so the acoustics have a home, as well as the rest of the bands gear.

                    I actually did what V(ader)Drummer mentioned, and converted my older pearl exports into an e-kit. I rock out all the time at home, without irritating the wife and kids. I am using a mixture of modules, Ddrum 4SE and Roland TMC6. Those go midi out to M-Audio FW410, out to Macbook Pro running EZDrummer. Pics below:

                    J
                    Attached Files
                    Edrums- KD-120, PD-125 (3), PD-105 (3), Yamaha PCY155, PCY-135 (4)
                    Module - Roland TD20X
                    Software - Pro Tools and Toontrack Superior

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      You can't compare a- and e-drums with photo cameras. A digital camera does the same things as an old fashioned camera and does it even better.

                      An e-kit is just a bunch of samples of a-kit sounds that you can reproduce by activating triggers. It has advances over an a-kit, but cannot replace an a-kit.

                      It depends on what kind of music you play to see if you can do it all on an e-kit. But I suggest that you keep your a-kit alongside an e-kit just for the fact that you can put your soul in playing acoustic.

                      Btw. I love playing my Roland TD6 for practicing and for realy small gigs.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Textom View Post
                        You can't compare a- and e-drums with photo cameras. A digital camera does the same things as an old fashioned camera and does it even better.

                        An e-kit is just a bunch of samples of a-kit sounds that you can reproduce by activating triggers. It has advances over an a-kit, but cannot replace an a-kit.

                        It depends on what kind of music you play to see if you can do it all on an e-kit. But I suggest that you keep your a-kit alongside an e-kit just for the fact that you can put your soul in playing acoustic.

                        Btw. I love playing my Roland TD6 for practicing and for realy small gigs.
                        Sure you can compare a digital camera with e drums, With e drums you can get all kinds of sounds with the same drum just by pressing a button, you don't have to change heads or do any muffling of bass drums or buy different cymbals...you have all the controls in the module. Now with a digital camera you can change the way a picture looks just by turning a dial, if your indoors you set your white balance for indoors (or flash) if your in the sun set your camera for sun , if your
                        in the shade you set it for shade and so on. With a film camera you have to make sure you have the right film, sometimes the right speed, there's film for different types of light, flourescent, incandescent etc. So think of a digital camera as the module and you get all different types of pictures just by turning a dial. I agree there's nothing like sitting behind a nice acoustic kit but the way e drums are getting better and better you never know.
                        [SIGPIC]

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          JrummerJ that's a nice set up! Are the cymbals old trashy ones converted to interface with the module? I like how clean the cables look - you need to stop by my OSHA nighmare and help me clean that up -- cables everywhere.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by vdrummer20 View Post
                            JrummerJ that's a nice set up! Are the cymbals old trashy ones converted to interface with the module? I like how clean the cables look - you need to stop by my OSHA nighmare and help me clean that up -- cables everywhere.
                            Thanks man! The crashes are a pair of Paiste 101 hihats that I bought just for the conversion. I think that I spent $70 to do both, including the cymbals, foam, Radio Shacks parts, and the Walmart mouse pad.

                            The ride is a B8pro that a buddy gave to me. Same conversion as the crashes, but then I cut down an old splash to make the bell. Mounted a piezo underneath the bell and separated the ride and bell with some foam. The wire for the bell piezo runs through the ride and into a mono 1/8" jack on the original project box. Both the bell and bow piezos are then wired to a TRS female jack and I use a stereo cable to go to the TMC6 input that supports dual piezo.

                            The rack helped a lot with the cables. I just kind of picked 2 or 3 places where all the cables seemed to come together and then I cut a small slit in the rug and ran them back behind me to the modules. A couple of zip ties to keep things in place and it is a pretty clean setup! You can do the same, just pull all the wires and spend a little time planning the routing and deciding which cable will work best with which pad (if you have different length cables like me).

                            J
                            Edrums- KD-120, PD-125 (3), PD-105 (3), Yamaha PCY155, PCY-135 (4)
                            Module - Roland TD20X
                            Software - Pro Tools and Toontrack Superior

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Textom View Post
                              You can't compare a- and e-drums with photo cameras. A digital camera does the same things as an old fashioned camera and does it even better.

                              An e-kit is just a bunch of samples of a-kit sounds that you can reproduce by activating triggers. It has advances over an a-kit, but cannot replace an a-kit.

                              It depends on what kind of music you play to see if you can do it all on an e-kit. But I suggest that you keep your a-kit alongside an e-kit just for the fact that you can put your soul in playing acoustic.

                              Btw. I love playing my Roland TD6 for practicing and for realy small gigs.
                              yeah, I'm not feelin this either.

                              My last A kit was an Ayotte kick-butt kit with a whole host of K cymbals racked up. I don't miss a thing. I don't play out live much anymore, but when I do, I plow thru the PA and have the TDA700 amp.

                              I can put plenty of soul into my TD20 kit...I bet you could to if you dumped those rubber pads - that may explain part of your reluctance right there. Basically playing on those is about like playing on a snare with the old vacuum pad on it. That was about enough to make me want to switch to Tuba

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X