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Can someone explain the DTX900 module?

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  • Can someone explain the DTX900 module?

    Hello, lot of knowledgable people here, so I'm hoping someone can explain the DTX900 module to me, specifically as compared to the TD20X module. I've read on this forum that the TD20 uses COSM modeling - does the Yamaha as well? How does the Yamaha's sound processing compare, in general, to the Roland module?

    The reason I'm asking is because I'm moving, and I am faced with either selling what I own and maybe buying a new set at some later date, or moving what I have. I have the TD20 expanded, and I like it, but I've been considering the new Yamaha set (although I'm still really not sold on those silicone pads). I can't play the Yamaha at home, just in the store, and I _think_ the drum sounds are better ... but that could just be because it's something new versus something that I already own (GAS!!!).

  • #2
    Yamaha is actual samples. They also have free downloads of VST kits at sonic reality. I think the Yamaha sounds more real although the td20x is very good. The Yamaha sounds can be tweaked extensively like the Roland.

    I like mesh pads but love the silicone pads. I played them at NAMM through the Neil Peart VST and thought they were amazing. They have a separate cross stick zone on the snare which is a big plus for me ,so you can still play light rimshots on the main rim instead of velocity switching. Roland has positonal sensing on the head which is nice to have and hopefully yamaha will have it some day as an update.

    Peter Warren
    Last edited by scd; 06-27-10, 11:04 PM.

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    • #3
      Thanks for the reply. That's weird that Roland wouldn't use real samples. I always thought the Yamaha sounded better, but I couldn't quite put my finger on what it was - the Roland just sounds a little more processed. Now I know why.

      I'd go for the new Yamaha hands-down if it weren't for the silicone pads. I have tried and tried to convince myself that I like them, but I don't. They're mushy and just feel weird to play. I like that they're more compact and quieter, and I like the on-board tweakable pitch (and snare looseness). But I don't like the feel, and I don't like the weird rim stuff on the snare - sometimes I cross-stick right-handed, and that 'zone' of the Yamaha rim isn't set up to click.

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      • #4
        Realism is in the ear of the behearer, even with "actual samples":

        Originally posted by Beau Harding View Post
        DTXTREME III tom sounds
        The "electronic" sounds seem prominent when doing fills around the toms.
        Bruce
        • Roland TD-20+TDW-20, TD-8, SPD-S, PD-105, PD-6/8, CY-5/6/8/12, FD-6/8, KD-7/8, RT-10K, PM-30, DB-90
        • Hart Acupad, Hart Hammer, Pintech Dingbat, Sony MDR-7505, Shure E2, 512. Pacific CX, Zildjian A Customs.

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        • #5
          I think the electronic reference was to the machine gun effect. It does help to not hit max velocity too much with the Roland and the Yamaha kits . I just got a DTxtreme III and there is no question that the sounds are more real due to them being actual recordings of drums vs models of audio waveforms. The playability could be debated between the 2 . I think they are about equal in that department. The Yamaha has very few samples per drum which is why it does not play and sound like a VST.

          The Roland TDW20 card really got close in realism. Roland kits play very nicely and have a nice punch to the sound. I also like how you can take a Roland snare and make it into something else that still sounds good with modeling.

          Peter

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          • #6
            Originally posted by FlamThrower View Post
            I'd go for the new Yamaha hands-down if it weren't for the silicone pads. I have tried and tried to convince myself that I like them, but I don't. They're mushy and just feel weird to play. I like that they're more compact and quieter, and I like the on-board tweakable pitch (and snare looseness). But I don't like the feel, and I don't like the weird rim stuff on the snare - sometimes I cross-stick right-handed, and that 'zone' of the Yamaha rim isn't set up to click.
            Wow...you're the first person I heard say that they don't like the feel of the new pads...I personally haven't tried them yet, so the jury is still out with me...hopefully next month I'll get to try them out in Atl.

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            • #7
              Yeah, I feel very weird being the only person to not like the pads. But I just don't. And I've tried them many, many times, just because everyone else is so happy with them. To me, they're just too soft-rubbery ... which makes sense because that's what they are. Kind of sticky and mushy.

              It reminds me of Hitchhiker's Guide: they're almost, but not quite, entirely unlike real drums. To be fair, so are mesh heads, but I guess I'm used to those by now. To justify selling all my stuff and re-buying Yamaha those new pads would have to blow me away, and they just don't. Even as a first purchase they're a pretty expensive choice.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by FlamThrower View Post
                Thanks for the reply. That's weird that Roland wouldn't use real samples. I always thought the Yamaha sounded better, but I couldn't quite put my finger on what it was - the Roland just sounds a little more processed. Now I know why.

                I'd go for the new Yamaha hands-down if it weren't for the silicone pads. I have tried and tried to convince myself that I like them, but I don't. They're mushy and just feel weird to play. I like that they're more compact and quieter, and I like the on-board tweakable pitch (and snare looseness). But I don't like the feel, and I don't like the weird rim stuff on the snare - sometimes I cross-stick right-handed, and that 'zone' of the Yamaha rim isn't set up to click.
                well...thats where you feel the difference.

                the machine is one thing...what it makes the player feel is another.

                i dont like the yammy. dont hate it...but wouldnt go for it.

                And i dont think they sound that real over rolands

                Unless my ears are older than my actual age

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